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Dr. Chinedu Obi

Senior Research Fellow

Profile

Dr. Chinedu Obi is an economist and consultant with the World Bank, a scientist consultant with World Fish. He holds a Joint Ph.D. in Socio-Economics and Agriculture, Food, and Environment from Ghent University, Belgium, and the University of Pisa, Italy. Additionally, he possesses an Erasmus Mundus International Master’s in Rural Development from both universities. Dr. Obi completed his Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Economics from Imo State University, Nigeria.

In his capacity as a World Bank Economist, Dr. Obi conducted nuanced micro-econometric analyses, addressing critical issues related to poverty, inequality, and labor markets, with a specific focus on refugees and host communities. His expertise extended to providing technical assistance in survey construction and data collection, including involvement in high-profile projects such as the Syrian refugee vulnerability assessment survey in Jordan.

Before joining the World Bank in 2020, Dr. Obi served as a post-doctoral researcher at the University of Pisa, Italy, and as a monitoring and evaluation consultant with World Fish in Malaysia. During his post-doctoral tenure (University of Pisa, Italy), he successfully co-managed two Horizon 2020 projects across ten universities, showcasing exceptional coordination and management skills. As a Monitoring & Evaluation Consultant (CGIAR-World Fish, Malaysia), Dr. Obi designed comprehensive evaluation frameworks and tools, leading to the publication of impactful research articles on gender equality, aquaculture productivity, and impact analysis.

Dr. Obi’s research interests are broad and impactful, covering areas such as welfare analysis, the migration-refugee-development nexus, climate change, labor market analysis, and the evaluation of social interventions. His work reflects a commitment to understanding and addressing the complex challenges faced by vulnerable populations.