Professor Chukwumereije

Nigeria to achieve 30% power supply from renewables by 2030: A rejoinder to the Vice President

Prof. Chukwumerije Okereke

In the past few days the Vice President, Prof. Yemi Osibanjo, has been reported by many news media as reaffirming the commitment that Nigeria will achieve at least 30% of its power supply from renewable energy by 2030. It is reported that he reinstated the commitment to this ambitious target while inaugurating a 1.12 MW Solar Hybrid Project at the Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University, in Bauchi State.

The intention to have at least 30% of the total electricity supply from renewable energy is very welcome and heartwarming. It signals that Nigeria is committed to the Paris Agreement and fulfilling its climate change action pledge as contained in the Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC). And perhaps more importantly it shows that Nigeria is cognizant of the global transition away from fossil fuel and the vast opportunities that renewable energy provide for solving the country’s energy poverty and economic development challenges. With around 80% of its rural population relying on wood, charcoal, dung, and other traditional biomass for cooking, there is no doubt that expanding access to affordable, reliable and clean household energy services is one of the most pressing developmental challenges facing Nigeria today. At the same time, the supply of adequate and affordable modern energy is a key enabler of other developmental sectors in the country.

Furthermore, the fact that this commitment is coming from the Vice President at the period of Covid-19 pandemic, indicates that Nigerian government understands that COVID-19 should not be used as an excuse to focus on more fossil fuels and ignore investment in renewable energy as a central piece of the post COVID-19 economic recovery.  It is commendable that the government has embarked on Energising Education Programme (EEP), which is aimed at solving the energy deficit in all the thirty-seven federal universities and seven teaching hospitals in the country by using renewable energy, with the programme having been completed four projects at four different sites.

 

However, in as much as the commitment is commendable, the government must be clear that just saying that 30% of total electricity supply will come from renewable energy by 2030 is not sufficient to make it happen. The commitment must instead be backed up by a clear and bold plan of actions. There is a need to fashion a workable strategy towards achieving the target because as of today Nigeria is not on course to meeting the pledge. So far, there have been several places where the government is missing it – namely political will, policy implementation and evaluation, financing and investment.

One mistake the country has made so far is that it has seemed to concentrate too much on solar energy in meeting this ambitious target. While aggressive investment in solar is welcome, focusing only on solar PV to meet the target as seems to be in the case in the current NDC is too ambitious and unrealistic. This overemphasised interest in solar PV electrification may also be responsible for the low renewable energy penetration in the country.

To stand a chance of meeting the target, the government must consider all other potentially viable renewable energy sources for on-grid and off-grid applications for household and productive uses. Some of the other commercially proven renewable energy resources in Nigeria include solar thermal, wind, small hydropower and bioenergy, with proven and commercially viable conversion technologies in the market. Incidentally, many of these could also support decentralised off-grid power generation which is crucial in closing the huge energy gap in the country. For example, recent demonstrations and pilots works have shown that there are substantial potentials for the utilisation of off-grid small hydropower plant in the Northern part of the country. Wind energy is also a credible candidate, especially in the North. For ecample, the Katsina wind farm has been proven to have the capacity to generate 10 MW on-grid electricity at costs scenarios that are very competitive. There is also a high potential for modern bioenergy technologies such as agro-waste-to-energy power plant for both on-grid and off-grid electricity generation, which is a matured technology globally.

Another mistake that the government is making is too much concentration on off-grid renewable energy and paying less attention to on-grid solutions. The calculations by the Nigerian Economic Summit Group has shown that the mini-grid market has revenue potential of US$8 billion and that the country’s large population and large economy make it attractive to investors in the energy access sector. In fact the heavy reliance on the off-grid supply-side energy solutions by the government runs counter to common logic that future increase in energy demand will be substantial in on-grid due to increase in economic activities in urban and peri-urban areas. While there are several good arguments in favour of distributive off-grid renewable energy, attention should also focus on increasing on-grid capacity to help power industrial economic growth, which Nigeria needs to meet its sustainable development goals.

Finally, the government needs to think seriously about the raft of other enabling conditions that are required to ensure the successful achievement of the renewable energy target by 2030. These include creating enabling environment for private sector involvement, enhancing the adequacy and reliability of energy data using machine learning tools, innovation in critical technologies – which include smart systems, storage and utilisation, batteries; and setting out long-term and holistic implementation plan with a clear strategy for finance,  capacity building, and institutional development that is specific to the renewable energy access sector alongside a friendly implementation process and adequate monitoring and evaluation plan.

Lack of access to modern energy is one of the greatest symptoms and cause of poverty in Nigeria. The fight against climate change has helped to provide the global environment in favour of clean and renewable energy where Nigeria has strong competitive economic advantages.  There is, therefore, an urgent need to give impetus to the 30% renewable energy supply ambition by 2030 and find innovative ways to achieve the transition to sustainable energy in Nigeria. Strong words and promises are of course useful but they will certainly not be enough.

Professor Chukwumerije Okereke is the Director of the Centre of Climate Change and Development at Alex Ekwueme Federal University Ndufu-Alike Ebonyi State, Nigeria. He is a Visiting Professor at Oxford University, UK and Coordinating Lead Author for the United Nations’ IPCC.

Reminder: Invitation To Participate In Webinar

The Centre for Climate Change and Development, Alex Ekwueme Federal University, Ndufu-Alike Ikwo, in partnership with World Resources Institute (WRI) Washington DC is organizing a webinar on “Aligning Nigeria’s Nationally Determined Contributions with the COVID-9 Recovery plan.”

In this webinar, global experts will explore the ways in which Nigeria’s revised NDC and its post-COVID-19 economic stimulus (the NESP) could be more closely connected so that they can reinforce each other and help put the country on the path to just green transition. Experts will also consider examples from other countries including the UK and the US. The main presentation will draw from how the Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) and the Post COVID-19 Economic stimulus can reinforce each other to set Nigeria on the path of a just green transition towards meeting its NDC contribution, a commissioned short analytical piece by the Center for Climate Change and Development as part of the project on providing independent critical analysis and input into the revision process of Nigeria’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) which is due for submission in November 2021.

Please join us on this important webinar to discuss the findings by leading national experts.

We look forward to seeing you.

To join the webinar, click on this link http://bit.ly/37eTlLJ   [Participation is free but registration is required]

Date: Thursday, 25th February, 2021

Time: 4:00 pm – 5.30 pm WAT (GMT 3:00pm)

Moderator: Prof Chukwumerije Okereke.

The webinar will feature James James Okeuhie, an experienced senior Climate Specialist, David Watskow, Director of World Resources Institute’s International Climate Initiative,  Mario Finch, Research analyst on International Climate Action Climate Program, World Resources Institute, Dayo Adesina, Director of the Project on Gas Expansion. Office of the Vice-President, Federal Republic of Nigeria, Dr Oladunni  Owo, National President of Women in Energy (oil and gas) and Hon Sam Onuigbo,  Former Chairman House of Rep Committee on Climate Change, and Vice President (Africa) GLOBE International, as panelists while Professor Chukwumerije Okereke, Director, CCCD AEFUNAI, is the host and facilitator.

Please feel free to share among your networks and contacts.

Dr. Oladunni Owo

Ekwueme Varsity Convenes Webinar on Nigeria’s Nationally Determined Contributions and Post Covid-19 Recovery Plans

Climate policy experts, government officials and other critical stakeholders in energy sectors from Nigeria and the United States will come together in a virtual event to discuss how the Nigeria’s revised NDC and its post-COVID-19 recovery plans could be aligned to put the country on the path to just green transition.

The webinar entitled “Aligning Nigeria’s Nationally Determined Contributions with the COVID-19 Recovery Plan”, is being organised by the Centre for Climate Change and Development (CCCD), Alex Ekwueme Federal University, Ndufu-Alike Ikwo (AEFUNAI), Ebonyi State, in partnership with World Resources Institute (WRI). It will hold on Thursday, February 25th, 2021 at 4pm to 5.30pm West African Time (WAT).

The webinar is part of a project aimed at injecting independent critical analysis into, and increasing public engagement and awareness, in the revision process of Nigeria’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) due for submission later this year.

The aim of the webinar, according to the Director of the Centre, Professor Chukwumerije Okereke, is for global experts will explore the ways in which Nigeria’s revised NDC and its post-COVID-19 economic stimulus (the NESP) could be more closely connected so that they can reinforce each other and help put the country on the path to just green transition.

Commenting on the forthcoming webinar, the Director, CCCD AEFUNAI, Professor Chukwumerije says: I am looking forward to hosting top national and international experts to discuss how Nigeria’s Nationally Determined Contributions (NDC) can be more strongly aligned with the country’s Covid-19 Recovery Plan the Nigerian Economic and Sustainability Plan (NESP). “In assembling these highly respected, experienced and diverse panelists from across the world to share their thoughts on how the Nigeria’s NDC can be strongly connected to the country’s COVID-19 Recovery Plan, CCCD AEFUNAI is delivering on its mandate to serve as a major think tank for facilitating research, awareness creation and advocacy for sound climate and development policies and practices in Nigeria. Also recommendations from the webinar would be documented and submitted to relevant government agencies for actions and implementations.

According to Professor Okereke, “The main presentation will draw from how the Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) and the Post COVID-19 Economic stimulus can reinforce each other to set Nigeria on the path of a just green transition towards meeting its NDC contribution, a commissioned short analytical piece by the Center for Climate Change and Development as part of the project on providing independent critical analysis and input into the revision process of Nigeria’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) which is due for submission later this year.

The webinar will feature James James Okeuhie, an experienced senior Climate Specialist, David Watskow, Director of World Resources Institute’s International Climate Initiative,  Mario Finch, Research analyst on International Climate Action Climate Program, World Resources Institute, Dayo Adesina, Director of the Project on Gas Expansion. Office of the Vice-President, Federal Republic of Nigeria, Dr Oladunni  Owo, National President of Women in Energy (oil and gas) and Hon Sam Onuigbo,  Former Chairman House of Rep Committee on Climate Change, and Vice President (Africa) GLOBE International, as panelists while Professor Chukwumerije Okereke, Director, CCCD AEFUNAI, is the host and facilitator.

The webinar is part of the webinar series under “Promoting critical analysis of, and stakeholders’ engagement with the revision of Nigeria’s NDC,” a project being undertaken by the CCCD AEFUNAI, with support from the WRI.

The one-year initiative that commenced from July 2020 will, according to Project Coordinator, Professor Okereke, help to widen the horizon of the discourse and compliment the current government led NDC revision process.

Chinedu Jude Nwasum

Communication Officer, CCCD AEFUNAI

Reminder for the Webinar on “Legal Perspectives to Raising Ambition and Implementing Nigeria’s NDC.”

The Centre for Climate Change and Development Alex Ekwueme Federal University is glad to announce a webinar on the legal perspectives of the NDC in Nigeria titled “legal Perspectives to raising ambition and implementing Nigeria’s NDC”.

The webinar will attract global experts to explore the legal dimensions of efforts by world governments to raise ambition and implement their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), with views from Nigeria and the rest of Africa, the US, and the UK. The main presentation will draw from the legal aspects of raising ambition and implementing Nigeria’s NDC commissioned by the Centre for Climate Change and Development as part of the project on providing independent critical analysis and input into the revision process of Nigeria’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC).

According to the Director CCCD AE-FUNAI, Prof. Chukwumerije Okereke, “ in the webinar, global experts will explore the legal legal dimensions of the efforts by world governemnts to raise ambition and implement their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), with views from Nigeria and the rest of Africa, the US and the UK”

The webinar comes up on Thursday, February 11th, 2021 at 4:00pm – 5.30pm WAT (GMT 3:00PM).

The following experts will speak during the webinar: Huzi Mshelia, Dr Tomilola Akanle Eni-ibukun, Selam Kidane Abebe, Yamide Dagnet and Prof. Chris Hilson.

You can register for the webinar through this link http://bit.ly/2MixrQK

Please keep a date with us and join the discussion.

For more information, the flyer and webinar description.

 


Webinar on

LEGAL PERSPECTIVES TO RAISING AMBITION AND IMPLEMENTING NIGERIA’S NDCS

The Centre or Climate Change and Development, Alex Ekwueme Federal University, Ndufu-Alike Ikwo, in partnership with World Resources Institute (WRI) Washington DC is organizing a webinar on “Legal Perspectives to raising ambition and implementing Nigeria’s NDC.”

Date: Thursday, 11th February, 2021

Time: 4:00 pm – 5.30 pm WAT (GMT 3:00pm)

Webinar Link: http://bit.ly/2MixrQK

[Participation is free but registration is required]

Description

Nigeria committed itself to an ambitious emission reduction through the Nationally Determined Contribution submitted to the UNFCCC and ratified by the country. Is this commitment a legal obligation? Is Nigeria doing enough or should the country increase its climate ambition with the on-going revision? What are the experiences and lessons from other African countries, the UK and the US? ion: In this webinar,

global experts will explore the legal dimensions of the efforts by world governments to raise ambition and implement their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), with views from Nigeria and the rest of Africa, the US, the UK. The main presentation will draw from the Legal Aspects of raising ambition and implementing Nigeria’s NDC a commissioned by the Center for Climate Change and Development as part of the project on providing independent critical analysis and input into the revision process of Nigeria’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) which is due for submission in November 2020. In the webinar, global experts will explore the legal dimensions of the efforts by world governments to raise ambition and implement their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs), with views from Nigeria and the rest of Africa, the US, the UK.

Panelist

Professor Chukwumerije Okereke

Professor Chukwumerije Okereke, Director of CCCD AEFUNAI, is a globally recognized leading scholar on climate governance and international development with expertise in climate justice, national green growth transition in Africa, climate adaptation, business climate strategies, environmental policy, advising governments, corporates and international institutions (e.g., UN, African Union).

 

Huzi Ishaku MsheliaHuzi Ishaku Mshelia, is the National Facilitator of Nigeria’s NDC revision programe. A trained lawyer with orientation in energy and environmental matters, he is a Director of Clean Energy, an organization working on policy and legal issues in climate change, energy and environment. He works extensively on climate change related issues and is consulting for several local and international organizations including the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA), UNDP, the Heinrich Böll Stiftung Nigeria (hbs), Environmental Rights Action/Friends of the Earth and the Federal Ministry of Environment.

Dr Tomilola Akanle Eni-ibukun is a lawyer with a Ph.D. in international environmental law from the University of Dundee. She obtained her LL.B. from the University of Lagos in Nigeria and an LL.M. in international law from University College London. She has taught at the University of Dundee, University of St Andrews and University of Lagos, and has also worked with various international organizations, including the United Nations and the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD). She currently works as an independent consultant on issues relation to climate change and sustainable development.

Selam Kidane Abebe is Legal Advisor to the African Group of Negotiators – the technical group that represent Africa in the UNFCCC negotiations. Selam is an Environmental Law Expert and member of the negotiating team in the Environmental Protection Authority of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia. She holds an LLB degree from Mekelle University, College of Law and Governance. She was involved in the task team that developed the NAMAs and NAPAs for Ethiopia. Ms. Abebe is also responsible for following up negotiation and CDM projects of the UNFCCC. Currently, she is coordinating and overseeing the implementation of a national Strategy on climate change named Climate Resilient Green Economy Strategy of Ethiopia.

Yamide DagnetYamide Dagnet is Director, Climate Negotiations at WRI. She leads projects and engagement on climate negotiations for the implementation of the Paris Agreement and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. Her work aims to advance the scaling-up of climate action and support, processes for transparent and verifiable climate data, accountability mechanisms for national commitments, and the necessary enabling, institutional and regulatory, and capacity building environments to transition toward a sustainable and fair zero-carbon and climate-resilient economy.

Yamide brings more than 18 years of experience in advancing environmental objectives, having worked for the UK, French and Belgian governments, including as a policy lead and negotiator on the UNFCCC measurement, reporting and verification framework for the UK, as manager of the UK greenhouse gas inventory, as the UK Deputy Focal Point for the IPCC, as a reviewer under the UNFCCC of countries’ national communications.

Prof. Chris HilsonProfessor Chris Hilson is an environmental law professor at the School of Law at Reading University in the UK. His research interest is in the areas of UK and EU Environmental Law and Policy, Law and Social Movements, Law and Climate Change, and EU Law. He was the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Environmental Law from 2008-2012 and has acted as an adviser on environmental law to NGOs including Client Earth and Friends of the Earth. He is a Member of the Advisory Board of the Journal of Environmental Law and member of the editorial board of the Review of European Administrative Law. His current research interests are in the areas of UK, EU and comparative environmental law and policy, climate law, and law and social movements.

Registration Link: http://bit.ly/2MixrQK